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AmandaPropaganda

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Reply with quote  #1 
I was super curious about Bacuri butter just because of the way it looked--a dark, rich brown that was almost black. In a Rainforest Chica video on YouTube, I heard Chrys recommend it for dark hair and I immediately placed my first order with rainforestchica.com to get my hands on some. And my intuition served me well. After smelling it for the first time, very pungent, I decided it would be best used as a pre-poo ingredient. My hair turned out softer after my first treatment using Bacuri butter than any other oil and butter before. Which is saying something because I collect oils and butters and if it's out there, I've tried it--tucuma, safflower, sunflower, hemp seed, Cupuacu, ucuuba, mafura oil, pumpkin seed, sapote, Haitian Black Castor, Shea, mango, cocoa butter, hibiscus, Ximenia, emu, avocado, olive, coconut, coffee, etc. Bacuri butter softens my hair better than any of them. So I did some research to find out why it worked so well, and this is what I found: Bacuri butter has been shown, due to the presence of tripalmitin in the butter, to actually penetrate the hair shaft, helping to fortify the hair and combat hygral fatigue during washing. Pervasive throughout natural hair information found online is the false claim that the only oils that penetrate the hair shaft are coconut oil, avocado oil and extra-virgin olive oil. In truth, many botanical oils penetrate the hair shaft to a certain degree, given enough time. For example, ucuuba butter and babassu oil are actually more penetrative than either avocado oil or extra-virgin olive oil. In addition to being able to penetrate the hair shaft, the high amount of fatty palmitoleic acid in Bacuri butter compared to other oils makes it an incredibly fantastic emollient that is particularly useful for treating coarse, kinky or Afro-textured hair, which is characteristically dry. Bacuri butter is also rich in methionine, an essential amino acid, the body’s primary source of sulfur. The body uses sulfur to influence hair follicles and promote healthy hair. Because it penetrates the hair shaft, strengthens the hair at the root, combats hygral fatigue and has an intense smell, Bacuri butter is best used as a pre-poo ingredient prior to washing. Bacuri Butter is actually one of the least known, but most effective pre-poo ingredients for naturally coarse or Afro-textured hair. Combined with either coconut oil or babassu oil, a Bacuri butter pre-poo hair mask will condition the hair deeply while also preventing protein loss during washing and conditioning. If you're protein sensitive, combine it with a ceramide (sunflower oil is a ceramide, and it's also more penetrative than either avocado or extra-virgin olive oil) for a wonderful deep conditioning treatment that will actually repair the cuticle of the hair. Allow it to penetrate the hair overnight, preferably 12 hours, for best results. Please wear a plastic processing cap under a satin bonnet to protect your pillow, bedding or other fabric coverings as Bacuri butter is greasy and will stain. Have you ever tried Bacuri butter? Is it a regular part of your hair regimen? And if so, how do you use it? Thoughts on the smell? [wink]

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doyolo

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Reply with quote  #2 
You know so much about the properties of the different oils and butters!  I fell in love with Bacuri butter very quickly, as well.  It is so soft and glides right into my hair, controlling frizziness and smoothing it out without weighing it down or stiffening it too much.  I can live with the smell (I just wonder how others perceive it sometimes!) but I also tried it as part of a mixture (Bacuri, Murumuru, Shea, Coconut Oil) that toned it down a bit.  By itself, it feels great but it does stain everything.  I don't mind it staining most things, but if I put it in before bedtime, I have started putting a towel over my pillow to try to keep it cleaner.

Here is how it looked in my curls, applying after a shower:

bacuri in hair.jpg 

I just finished my run of sampling the butters one by one.  I posted on most of the butters elsewhere, but I just tried the Cupuacu butter as well.  Here is a picture of my hair before (left) and after (right) adding Cupuacu butter.  I do love the smell of this butter.  It goes on fairly smoothly, but did tend to slightly stiffen my hair when I worked it in.  It was just a slight bit waxier feeling.  Still nice, though.

left before right cupuacu.jpg 
Now that I have had a feel for each butter individually, I may try to mix them together to get the best of all their properties in one.  Have you mixed anything with Bacuri butter?

Mandolin

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Reply with quote  #3 
Thank you Amanda,

I'm still trying to find a good use.  I agree the benefits from the pre-poo with Bacuri Butter is so great.  But I really do not like smell, and can not yet find something to mask it.  Really great read about the butter qualities.

Thank you
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chrysrocha

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Reply with quote  #4 
Hi ladies, as a huge fan of Bacuri oil I feel the need to add my 2 cents to this thread. First, yes, it stains, since I usually apply it on my arms and shoulders (I love the sun, this butter has sunscreen properties and helps with the dry/gator like skin sun worshipers get) I was staining even the walls of my house. So please be careful.
Due to this butter's misunderstood scent, I think the pre-poo idea great, but it also helps modeling curls, so I do use it as a leave in, but usually mixed with murumuru in a 1 part bacuri to 2 parts murumuru, for leave in use I use VERY little, since my hair is very fine. The kind of hair that without anything will frizz like crazy but anything I put on can make it super heavy, like I am wearing those gels from the 80s.
My favorite use for this butter is out in the sun, besides protecting my hair, the heat turns it into a treatment and outdoors the scent will dissipate fast.

The only scents I would mix with it is good quality essential oils... But I still haven't tried one that will work with Bacuri's scent. Have you?



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AmandaPropaganda

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Reply with quote  #5 
Doyolo, I'm hair obsessed! It's my absolutely favorite thing to research. Regarding your question about if I've mixed Bacuri butter w/anything, I've had such amazing luck with this pre poo recipe, I had to share. I dry detangle my hair with Babassu oil, section by section, and two-strand twist each section so I know where I've been and to get it out of the way. If you are protein-sensitive, use a different penetrative oil. The main ingredient is Bacuri butter, which I combine with Brazil nut oil, Caiaue oil, raw Manuka honey and patchouli essential oil. I unravel one section at a time, apply the mix with vinyl gloved hands until it's saturated, re twist and keep going until my whole head is covered. My hair is long, so I clip the twists to the top of my head and then steam it all in for 25 minutes using my hair steamer. Raw honey is a humectant so it holds on to that moisture while the heat and steam open the hair shaft so the oils can penetrate. I then immediately trap the warm moisture by covering my head with a plastic processing cap and some Saran Wrap to keep it from moving around too much. I throw a cheap black satin bonnet that I get from Walgreens for less than three dollars over the top and I lay down a towel over my pillow. (Totally feeling you on the towel thing, it's a must!) Then go to sleep. About 12 hours later, I rinse it as much as I can and honey is completely water-soluble so you don't have to worry about it being this sticky, tacky mess that won't wash out of your hair. Water just melts honey away. What remains are the oils and butter. Honey helps rinse a bit of the oils out, but this is one of those pre-Poo recipes that you're going to have to shampoo out. You can try co-washing it out, but I found myself using way too much conditioner. A sulfate free shampoo worked beautifully without stripping my hair of its natural oils or the oil conditioning that I just did. I deep condition my hair weekly. I think you can use either a deep conditioner or a regular conditioner with this recipe, but your hair will feel like butter. My hair was so soft after this treatment, I had to put it away because I had hands-in-hair syndrome all day long. Amazing! If you like Bacuri butter, you gotta try it.

Happy experimenting!
AmandaPropaganda

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Reply with quote  #6 
Mandolin and Chrys,
Yes, the smell is pungent. Undeniable. I once described it as smelling like weed and ash, like funky in that same kind of way! I worried that I smelled like my college days! Ever since I discovered Bacuri butter's softening effects on my hair, it's my go-to for heavy pre-pooing. So I'm using it often and not only am I totally used to the smell of it, it really does not offend me at all anymore, but I agree with Chrys that the smell dissipates. I absolutely love using essential oils and there are some that are amazing for dry hair, like: patchouli, rose, cedarwood, sandalwood, clary sage, cypress, lavender, geranium, chamomile, ylang ylang and carrot seed. I'll attach some info I got from mountain roses blog on essential oils for hair care. So a few drops of several of those in my pre-poos and I barely can even smell it anymore. But again, I feel like it's one of those things you totally get used to and the pay off on that butter for my hair is so extreme-significantly increased pliability and the strengthening aspect have allowed me to grow my hair at a faster rate than ever before-it's no longer an issue for me.

Chrys, I answered another post of yours ( late… Sorry…Ever since I got my package of butters I've been in it and doing lots of experimenting) about Bacuri butter and essential oils and I'm curious if the combo of frankincense and myrrh would make the smell more pleasant, both of which would have therapeutic effects on skin and hair, or even vanilla and chocolate essential oils, not fragrance oils, to push it towards something more dessert-y. Thoughts?

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AmandaPropaganda

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Reply with quote  #7 
Doyolo,
Cupuacu butter is my second favorite. It smells amazing! Like some kind of chocolate! You almost want to eat it! I hear you on the stiffening, but I like to wear my hair in a wash-and-go hairstyle, and I like to separate my curls after my hair has had a chance to dry to give it all more volume. Because I henna my hair, I now have these large curls and waves where I used to have smaller crimps and curls. Lots of hair goes into making those large curls and so my hair dries smaller than I actually like. I add oils to my fingertips so that as I'm pulling the curls apart, I'm not making my hair frizzy. I like to rub a chunk of cupuacu butter between my fingers until it melts and then use that oil to help separate my curls and to scrunch the hair to make it more voluminous. That stiffening almost works like a very soft mousse or an extremely light hairspray in the sense that it allows me to mold the shape of my hair a little bit. When I separate my curls and scrunch, the butter keeps the curls separate and holds some of the shape and so my hair looks bigger than ever before. Girl, that stiffening is working for me. I love it!
AmandaPropaganda

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Reply with quote  #8 
Chrys,
When are you making more Bacuri butter soaps? I got lost in the experimenting abyss and totally missed that and now they're all sold out.
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